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Denmark

Background information on industrial relations in Denmark

  • 26 Oct 2009
    Denmark: Increase in industrial holiday shutdowns due to recession

    The Danish-based multinational wind turbine blade manufacturer, Vestas, closed for three weeks during the summer of 2009. A survey by the Danish Federation of Small and Medium-sized Enterprises shows that many of the federation’s member companies have closed for holidays in 2009. The industrial holiday was thought to be a relic from a distant past, but has been resurrected by companies as a means to deal with the current economic recession.

  • 14 Oct 2009
    Denmark: Strike action and work stoppages in 2008

    Conflicts in connection with collective bargaining for public sector employees in the Danish municipalities and regions resulted in some 1,837,600 lost working days in 2008. All other work stoppages resulted in about 31,400 lost working days. The pattern of the last decade – that mainly single strikes dominate the statistics – was thus confirmed. Figures on unofficial strikes alone showed a significant decline in tendency, largely due to the global economic crisis.

  • 22 Sep 2009
    Representativeness of the European social partner organisations: Steel industry – Denmark

    The aim of this representativeness study is to identify the respective national and supranational actors (i.e. trade unions and employer organisations) in the field of industrial relations in the steel industry in Denmark. In order to determine their relative importance in the sector’s industrial relations, this study will, in particular, focus on their representational quality as well as on their role in collective bargaining.

  • 18 Sep 2009
    Denmark – Greening the European economy: responses and initiatives by Member States and social partners

    The Danish Government has issued a proposal called ‘Green Growth’, which focuses on the mitigation of the effects of climate changes on agriculture and the food industry sector. The proposal is not so much a contribution to harness the potential of green economy as it is a proposal that focuses on protecting the environment. In comparison the social partners and the Danish business and trades have been promotors in the part that concerns greening the energy sector and hereby diminishing CO2 emissions. This is done through focussing on sustainable technology or green tech.

  • 15 Sep 2009
    Denmark: Flexicurity and industrial relations

    The Danish labour market has been praised as prime example of flexicurity. The Golden Triangle – the mutually supporting combination of a flexible labour market, generous welfare schemes and active labour market policy - has often been used to illustrate flexicurity in Denmark. There is no doubt that this model grasps important dynamics of the Danish labour market. However, the model overestimates the generosity of the welfare schemes. Moreover, it is important to note that there is great variation within the Danish flexicurity model. This has led to the question if new ways should be found to describe the dynamics of flexicurity the Danish way – and if flexicurity has been granted with too much weight in explaining the successful Danish economy and good labour market performance.

  • 05 Aug 2009
    Denmark: Cross-border cooperation at company level in banking sector

    New forms of cross-border cooperation have developed at company level in the banking sector as a response to the free movement of capital, the common currency, and mergers and acquisitions of banks across Europe. A new study on the experiences of Danish multinational banks and their European affiliates in this regard reveals that some banks and trade unions have signed cross-border agreements and texts, as well as set-up different arbitration systems to handle potential company-level disputes.

  • 30 Jul 2009
    Representativeness of the European social partner organisations: Tanning and leather sector – Denmark

    The aim of this representativeness study is to identify the respective national and supranational actors (i.e. trade unions and employer organisations) in the field of industrial relations in the tanning and leather sector in Denmark. In order to determine their relative importance in the sector’s industrial relations, this study will, in particular, focus on their representational quality as well as on their role in collective bargaining.

  • 15 Jul 2009
    Denmark: Multinational companies and collective bargaining

    The impact of MNCs on the Danish collective bargaining system is limited. Although large Danish companies and MNCs have a certain influence on the bargaining agenda through membership of the dominating employers’ associations, the influence of foreign MNCs is hardly present. In general foreign MNCs experience the Danish model of collective bargaining as a guarantee for a peaceful labour market. Most MNCs have signed collective agreements.

  • 01 Jun 2009
    Denmark: Economic crisis leads to extensive use of work-sharing

    In Denmark, the practice of work-sharing is growing extensively, to help mitigate the significant increase in redundancies during 2009 arising from the economic recession. The social partners and companies have called for more flexible rules concerning work-sharing; however, the government has been reluctant to introduce them. In March 2009, the government issued ‘Four initiatives to support employees threatened by unemployment’, which generated considerable scepticism.

  • 28 Apr 2009
    Denmark: Wage flexibility and collective bargaining

    DURING THE last three decades a coordinated decentralisation process in both manufacturing and banking has taken place. Over the years more decisions about wage and working conditions has been transferred to the company level, although without cutting the bonds to the central level. This process is called centralised decentralisation. The decentralisation has had a significant effect on wage formation. In both sectors the focus on wage flexibility as a means to better performance of both sides in the company has resulted in an introduction of especially performance-related pay systems. This development, however, has taken place within the collective bargaining system and within the centralised decentralisation.

  • 28 Apr 2009
    Representativeness of the European social partner organisations: Hospitals – Denmark

    The aim of this representativeness study is to identify the respective national and supranational actors (i.e. trade unions and employer organisations) in the field of industrial relations in the hospital sector in Denmark. In order to determine their relative importance in the sector’s industrial relations, this study will, in particular, focus on their representational quality as well as on their role in collective bargaining.

  • 31 Mar 2009
    Denmark: Wage formation

    Wage formation in Denmark is mainly based on collective and to a lesser degree individual bargaining. There is no legislation neither regarding wage formation in general nor regarding a national minimum wage. Wage formation in the trend-setting private sector is mostly settled at sectoral level as a minimum increase, which is then followed up by company level bargaining. Wage formation in the IT sector mainly follows the same pattern, but individual negotiations about pay are dominant in highly skilled, innovative companies and within the internet related businesses. Wage formation in the public sector is traditionally centralised and a system called New Pay has not been the success it was meant to be.

  • 09 Mar 2009
    The impact of the information and consultation directive on industrial relations — Denmark

    This comparative report provides a general overview of the steps taken in Denmark to implement the 2002 Directive on informing and consulting employees.

  • 23 Feb 2009
    Denmark: Tripartite agreement on reducing sickness absence

    In September 2008, the Danish government concluded an agreement with the Danish Confederation of Trade Unions and the Confederation of Danish Employers on reducing sickness absence in companies. The agreement aims to get 4,000 persons back to work and thereby help to ease the current significant pressure on the labour market. The initiative is expected to cost almost €23 million; however, up to €5 billion is currently spent each year on sick pay.

  • 12 Feb 2009
    Denmark: Collective bargaining and continuous vocational training

    CVT in Denmark is mainly provided and paid for by the state, whereas the collective agreements establish the right to take up CVT. The social partners are deeply involved in all bodies at all levels concerning the content and the development of CVT.

Page last updated: 21 July, 2014